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Motorbiking Ride in Vietnam: What To Know

Motorbiking ride in Vietnam had caught the tourist’s attention lately. It is entirely a different kind of experience whenever you are in the place. It gives easier and quicker access to visiting temples and places in the area. However, there should be precautionaries that you should know before riding one.

Today, let’s dig into the things that you should know before going for a motorbiking ride in Vietnam. Also, if you are looking for a reliable source for Vietnam visa requirements hong kong, click on here to know.

Renting or Buying in Vietnam

Try to rent from reputable companies that provide reliable vehicles, rather than Chinese knock-offs. One of the most popular is Tigit Motorbikes. Many travelers choose to buy cheap $200 bikes from fellow backpackers to keep their travel costs down. I cannot stress enough the value in renting or buying a proper, well-maintained bike; the hassle of repairing your constantly breaking bike and cost will soon match or exceed the price of renting a newer motorbike. Vietnamese roads are dangerous enough without making life harder with a faulty motorbike

Renting a Motorbike Outside of Vietnam

Vietnam generally only allows Vietnamese bikes into the country. You will be facing difficulties crossing borders from Laos, Cambodia, and China on a non-Vietnamese bike. Expect to pay some hefty bribes, or not cross at all, depending on how frequented your border is and how much the border security cares about letting you in.

Riding in Vietnam

Expect average to poor roads the majority of the time, along with heavy traffic. Vietnam has built good highways but only cars and trucks are allowed to use them, and as they come with a toll, most vehicles will still use the rougher and narrow roads that motorbikes must use. Roadsides will often be filled with stalls, markets, and livestock, so please pay attention at all times.

Traffic is also chaotic, but drivers in Vietnam are politer and more aware than other southeast Asian countries. Most trucks will beep to warn you out of the way before overtaking, so pay attention to your fellow motorists. If you’re not sure they can see you, warn them by using your horn. This especially applies to the twisting mountain roads in the west and north, as there are multiple blind corners with no space and the only way to know you can pass safely is to ensure any oncoming traffic can hear you coming!